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Legal Services

The International Brotherhood helps local lodges and members get the legal representation they need through our relationships with Blake & Uhlig; Jones, Granger, Tramuto & Halstead (formerly Jones & Granger); other law firms; and Union Plus Legal Resources.

If your lodge needs an attorney, contact your International representative or International vice president.

Individual members in the United States can get legal help through the Union Plus Legal Resources program. No enrollment forms or fees are required. Boilermaker members are automatically enrolled and are entitled to the following benefits for each separate legal matter:

  • A free initial consultation with a lawyer of up to 30 minutes (in person or over the phone),
  • A free simple document review and explanation
  • A free follow-up letter or phone call, if likely to resolve a legal matter.
  • Most additional services are discounted by 30% (including attorney's hourly rates and flat fees for most common legal cases.)

Spouses and dependents of Boilermakers may also use this service. Union Plus programs are not available to our members in Canada.

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