Skip to main content

LEAP Issues

50th Annual LEAP Conference

April 22 - 25, 2018
The Mayflower Hotel
1127 Connecticut Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20036

Tags  LEAP Issues

Tags  LEAP Issues
Reporter  V51N1

LEAP highlights key issues for 2012

Gridlocked Congress, elections challenge conference delegates

WHEN THE LEAP conference convenes in Washington, D.C., in late April, delegates will strive to get their message across to a Congress mired in GOP obstructionism. Making this situation even more complex is the fact that 2012 is an election year for the presidency, the U.S. House, and one third of the Senate — as well as numerous state and local positions. Clearly, lawmakers will be distracted by re-election campaigns.

Tags  LEAP Issues
Reporter  V51N1

Rep. Higgins to receive first Abe Breehey award

Rep. Brian Higgins (D-NY 27th)

U.S. congressman had strong ties with late IBB legislative director

U.S CONGRESSMAN BRIAN Higgins (D-NY 27th) will become the first recipient of the Abe Breehey Legislator of the Year award in recognition of his tireless work on behalf of working families. International President Newton B. Jones will present the award April 25th, during the 44th annual LEAP conference in Washington, D.C.

Tags  LEAP Issues
Reporter  V51N1

Boilermaker wins labor activist award

Labor activist Wilmer Ellis and his wife, Juanita, during a LEAP conference.

Local 549 member honored for political efforts

LOBBYING, PRECINCT WALKING, and phone banking to elect labor-friendly candidates are all in a day’s work for Local 549 (Pittsburg, Calif.) member Wilmer Ellis. A Boilermaker of 34 years, Ellis has been selected by the Contra Costa County Central Labor Council and Building & Construction Trades Council for the Labor Activist of the Year Award.

Locals  L-549
Reporter  V51N1

VIDEO: Purdue professor discusses ‘Occupy Super Bowl’

Tithi Bhattacharya, an associate professor of South Asian History at Purdue University and a protester who is taking part in Occupy the Super Bowl, discusses the protest and the opposition to Indiana’s so-called “right-to-work” law.


Right to work passes Indiana Senate

THOUSANDS OF UNION members, including Boilermakers, rally outside the Indiana statehouse in Indianapolis against right to work as the state Senate votes 28-22 to pass the legislation today. Gov. Mitch Daniels is expected to sign the bill into law, making Indiana the 23rd state in the nation with “right to work for less” on the books.


Indiana state rep blasts GOP push for right to work

Indiana House Minority Leader B. Patrick Bauer

Democratic leader says RTW “doesn’t put Hoosiers back to work.”

IN A FIERY written statement broadcast via e-mail Jan. 25, Indiana State House Minority Leader B. Patrick Bauer unloaded on Republican House members who helped pass a “right to work for less” bill. If House Bill 1001 becomes law, Indiana will become the 23rd right to work state.

Bauer, the House Democratic leader from District 6, has been an outspoken critic of right to work and has led the statehouse charge against it for the last two legislative sessions.


Pages

Latest News

  • L-374’s Nick Tokarz explains the hammer forging process.

    L-374 treats visiting instructors to blacksmithing demo

    Read More

  • Bank of Labor’s newest office opened in 2015 in Washington, D.C., expanding operations to reach the headquarters of many U.S.-based unions.

    Bank of Labor puts union money back to work — for unions

    Read More

  • It's time to end oilsands shaming

    Read More

  • Newton B. Jones, Intl. President

    EPA proposes replacement for Clean Power Plan

    Read More

  • Members of Local D239 in Three Forks, Montana, man the picket line outside the Imerys Talc facility that locked them out August 2. Lodge president Randy Tocci holds a toy unicorn, referencing Montana Governor Steve Bullock’s assertion to the media that the lockout is a “unicorn” in Montana — a rare occurrence. The last lockout in the state happened in the 1980s.

    Locked out L-D239 stands strong, seeks return to work, fair contract

    Read More